select search llc Recruiter for Environmental, Health and Safety Professionals | Select Search, LLC

Safety, Health, Security and PSM Manager

Chemical Manufacturer in the Baton Rouge area is looking for a  person to Lead the Health Safety Security and PSM program for the site.  This role will have 5 direct reports.  Ideal candidate will have previous managerial experience.  Must have strong communication and leadership skills.  Bachelors and Minimum 6-10 years experience.

Corporate Environmental Manager, South Carolina

Fortune 500 Manufacturing client with over a century in business is searching for a Global Corporate Environmental Manager.  Ideal candidate will have experience driving environmental programs  at a Corporate, Divisional, Business Unit or Multi plant level.  Must have a minimum 10 years experience and Bachelors Degree.  Overall Air, Water and Waste background preferred.  Mix of Title V, RCRA and NPDES.  Excellent compensation, relocation and benefits.

Recent Job Listings at Select Search

Health, Safety and Security Manager – Arkansas

  • To 115K plus bonus, benefits and relocation
  • Reports to the Plant Manager
  • No Environmental responsibilities.(Separate Department)
  • 900 person, non union manufacturing site.
  • Safety performance is good but looking to become world-class
  • Experience implementing and or running a world-class safety program
  • Ability to influence and drive change
  • Must be a leader.
  • Ability to analyze and improve programs.  Ability to drive cultural change and engage employees
  • Bachelors Degree required
  • Certifications a plus(CSP, CIH, etc.)

HSE Specialist

  • Fortune 500 Company
  • Alabama (Refining)
  • Position is responsible for Safety, PSM and IH as part of a team within a manufacturing facility.  This position required previous process safety management experience.  Any additional environmental is a plus.  Reports to the HSE Manager.
  • Ideal candidate will have a minimum 5 years experience.
  • Bachelors in Safety, Sciences or Engineering required.
  • Must have strong communication skills and ability to lead
  • Excellent benefits and relocation provide.

Safety Manager

  • Atlanta, GA (Automotive)
  • Must have former manufacturing experience
  • Minimum 5 years experience
  • Former Managerial experience a preference. 4 direct reports.
  • Strong leadership and communication skills.
  • Will direct Safety program for an 1100 employee non union facility.
  • Fortune 100 employer.  Excellent benefits, base and bonus.
  • Reports to the Dir EHS
  • Relocation provided.

Health, Safety and Environmental Coordinator

  • Houston (Oil and Gas)
  • Bachelors Required.
  • Overall Safety, IH, and PSM responsibility for this chemical facility.
  • Reports to the EHS Mgr.
  • Willingness to cross-train with environmental.  Emphasis on Safety
  • Minimum 3 years experience
  • Strong communication skills.
  • Relocation provided.

Environmental, Health and Safety Coordinator

  • Arkansas (General Manufacturing)
  • Min 3 years experience
  • Emphasis on Safety
  • Reports to the Plant Manager
  • Excellent safety culture corporate wide.
  • BS Required.
  • Position will lead to larger roles in the future.
  • Relocation provided.

Corporate Director Safety, Health and Environmental

  • Tennessee (General Manufacturing)
  • Min 10 years experience
  • Multi plant heavy manufacturing background a preference
  • Reports to the VP HSE
  • BS Required.
  • Certifications a plus.
  • Must be able to analyze, develop and improve programs
  • Ability to lead and influence others is essential

Corporate Director Safety, Health and Environmental

  • Ohio (General Manufacturing)
  • Min 10 years experience
  • Multi plant heavy manufacturing background a preference
  • Reports to the VP HSE
  • BS Required.
  • Certifications a plus.
  • Must be able to analyze, develop and improve programs
  • Ability to lead and influence others is essential

Environmental Engineer

  • Oklahoma (Oil and Gas)
  • Overall multimedia environmental background a must.  Air water and waste
  • Bachelors Degree Required.
  • Must have basic air knowledge
  • Reports to the Regional Environmental Manager
  • Must be able to work with all levels of management and the plant.
  • Communication and leadership skills are essential to the success of the position.
  • Rural area.
  • Excellent benefits, base, bonus and relocation provided.

Safety Specialist

  • South Carolina (Manufacturing)
  • Bachelors Degree required
  • Position reports to the Safety Director
  • 1000 employee unionized site
  • Must have sold leadership skills and experienced building a Safety culture

Environmental Manager

  • Iowa  (Chemicals)
  • Site level Environmental Manager reporting to the Plant Manager
  • Must have strong air background including permitting experience
  • Must have experience with EMS
  • Bachelors Degree required.
  • Salary, bonus, benefits and relocation provided.

Environmental Engineer

  • South Texas (Refining)
  • Site level environmental engineer.
  • Part of a team and focusing on RCRA and NPDES
  • Any air experience a plus
  • Bachelors of Science or engineering a must
  • Reports to the Environmental Manager
  • Salary, bonus, benefits and relocation provided

Environmental Engineer

  • South Texas (Chemicals)
  • Site level environmental engineer.
  • Part of a team and focusing on Air
  • Any waste or water experience a plus
  • Bachelors of Science or engineering a must
  • Reports to the Environmental Manager
  • Salary, bonus, benefits and relocation provided

Environmental Specialist

  • West Texas (Oil and Gas)
  • Regional Environmental position.
  • Reports to the Corporate Environmental Director
  • Must have solid overall multimedia background.(Air water and waste)
  • Must have basic air compliance experience
  • Permitting a plus
  • Texas regulatory experience a plus but not required.
  • Bachelors Degree required.
  • Base, bonus, benefits and relocation provided

HSE Specialist

HSE Specialist

  • Fortune 500 Company
  • Alabama (Refining)
  • Position is responsible for Safety, PSM and IH as part of a team within a manufacturing facility.  This position required previous process safety management experience.  Any additional environmental is a plus.  Reports to the HSE Manager.
  • Ideal candidate will have a minimum 5 years experience.
  • Bachelors in Safety, Sciences or Engineering required.
  • Must have strong communication skills and ability to lead
  • Excellent benefits and relocation provide.

Health, Safety and Security Manager – Arkansas

Health, Safety and Security Manager – Arkansas

  • To 115K plus bonus, benefits and relocation
  • Reports to the Plant Manager
  • No Environmental responsibilities.(Separate Department)
  • 900 person, non union manufacturing site.
  • Safety performance is good but looking to become world-class
  • Experience implementing and or running a world-class safety program
  • Ability to influence and drive change
  • Must be a leader.
  • Ability to analyze and improve programs.  Ability to drive cultural change and engage employees
  • Bachelors Degree required
  • Certifications a plus(CSP, CIH, etc.)

Reasons for Not Accepting Counter Offer

By Anonymous

Where is the money for the Counter Offer coming from? Is it your next raise, early? All companies have strict wage and salary guidelines which must be followed.

You have now made your employer aware that you are unhappy. From this day on, your loyalty will always be in question.

When promotion time comes around, your employer will remember who was loyal and who wasn’t.

Once the word gets out, the relationship that you now enjoy with your coworkers will never be the same.

What type of company do you work for if you have to threaten to resign before they give you what you are worth?

When times get tough, your employer will begin the cutback with you.

The same circumstances that now cause you to consider a change will repeat themselves in the future; even if you accept a Counter Offer.

Statistics show that if you accept a Counter Offer, the probability of your voluntarily leaving in six months or being let go within one year is extremely high.

Beware of the Counter Offer

Your Whole Career is at Stake

If you have accepted an offer from a new employer and on giving your notice to your present company a Counter Offer is made, you should consider the following:

Ask yourself if you were worth “X” dollars yesterday. Why are they suddenly willing to now pay you “Y” dollars today when you were not anticipating a raise for some time. (Consider the fact that your present employer could be merely “buying time” with this raise until he can locate a suitable replacement).

Is just more money going to change everything in your present job? Consider the new opportunity you will be giving up that looked so favorable when you accepted it.

The company will probably feel as though they have been “blackmailed into giving you a raise when you announced your decision to leave.

Realize that you are now a marked man. The possibility of promotion is extremely limited for someone who has “given notice”. The company is vulnerable, they know it and will not risk giving more responsibility to someone who was previously committed to leave.

When economic slow-downs occur, you could be one of the first to go. You indicated your intention to go once before, so it is only natural that your position would be eliminated in a slack period.

You should know that statistics compiled by the National Employment Association confirm the fact that over 80% of those people who elected to accept a Counter Offer and stayed are no longer with their company six months later.

Carefully review in your mind all the reasons you wanted to make a change in the first place. Does the Counter Offer really offset these reasons?

If you intent to seriously consider a Counter Offer, be sure you ask you present employer to confirm all the details of said offer in writing.

Resignations

resignations
When you do resign from your present employer, be sure to do so in writing, retaining a copy for yourself. This procedure is to protect you in the future because future reference checks could record the separation as mutually beneficial.

Also, because our company specializes in recruiting within this industry, please keep our name confidential. We would appreciate not being in a position which would cause us to have a conflict with your current employer.

Counter Offer Acceptance: Road to Career Ruin

By Paul Hawkinson

Mathew Henry, the 17th-century writer said, “Many a dangerous temptation comes to us in fine gay colours that are but skin deep.” The same can be said for counteroffers, those magnetic enticements designed to lure you back into the nest after you’ve decided it’s time to fly away.

The litany of horror stories I have come across in my years as an executive recruiter, consultant and publisher provides a litmus test that clearly indicates counteroffers should never be accepted. EVER!

I define a counteroffer simply as an inducement from your current employer to get you to stay after you’ve announced your intention to take another job. We’re not talking about those instances when you receive and offer but don’t tell your boss. Nor are we discussing offers that you never intended to take, yet tell your employer about anyway as a “they-want-me-but-I’m-staying-with you” ploy.

These are merely astute positioning tactics you may choose to use to reinforce your worth by letting your boss know you have other options. Mention of a true counteroffer, however, carries an actual threat to quit.

Interviews with employers who make counteroffers, and employees, who accept them, have shown that as tempting as they may be, acceptance may cause career suicide. During the past 20 years, I have seen only isolated incidents in which an accepted counteroffer has benefited the employee. Consider the problem in its proper perspective.

What really goes through a boss’s mind when someone quits?

  • “This couldn’t be happening at a worse time.”
  • “This is one of my best people. If I let him quit now, it’ll wreak havoc on the morale of the department.”
  • “I’ve already got one opening in my department. I don’t need another right now.”
  • “I’m working as hard as I can, and I don’t need to do his work, too.”
  • “If I lose another good employee, the company might decide to “lose” me too.”
  • “My review is coming up and this will make me look bad.”
  • “Maybe I can keep you on until I find a suitable replacement.”

What will the boss say to keep you?

  • “I’m really shocked. I thought you were as happy with us as we were with you. Let’s discuss it before you make your final decision.”
  • “I’ve been meaning to tell you about the great plans we have for you, but it’s been confidential until now”.
  • “Upper management has you in mind for some exciting and expanding responsibilities.”
  • “Your raise was scheduled to go into effect next quarter, but we’ll make it effective immediately.”

Let’s face it. When someone quits, it’s a direct reflection on the boss. His gut reaction is to do what has to be done to keep you from leaving until he’s ready.

Staying is much easier than committing to the unknown but before accept a counteroffer, consider the following:

Any situation in which an employee is forced to get an outside offer before the present employer will suggest a raise, promotion or better working conditions, is suspect.

No matter what the company says when making its counteroffer, you will always be considered a fidelity risk. Having once demonstrated your lack of loyalty (for whatever reason), you will lose your status as a “team player” and your place in the inner circle.

Your reasons for wanting to leave still exist. Conditions are just made a bit more tolerable short term because of the raise, promotion or promises made to keep you.

Counteroffers are only made in response to a threat to quit. Will you have to solicit an offer and threaten to quit every time you deserve better working conditions?

Click here to read more about why you should beware of the Counter Offer

Reasons for Not Accepting a Counter Offer

Resume Template

Name

Address

Work # / Home #

e-mail

No Objective Statement — Reason: An “objective statement” provides a screen for HR. Do not be eliminated from opportunities based on a subjective interpretation.

Education

(Reverse chronology)
Institution
Degree
Dates

Employment History

Start / End Date with Employer Employer Name
All positions held in last 5 years (even if more than one position is with the same employer):
Title (Dates help only if in more than one position with the same employer)
15-25 word description of duties, followed by:
3-4 bullet statements.
Note: a) tasks that have been undertaken, b) their results, and c) dollar ($) figure quantification of what the results meant to your employer (e.g., how time was saved, efficiency increased, process improved, revenue generated, disaster averted, etc.) The bulleted statements should provide an answer to a potential employer’s question: “What’s in it for us”?

Start / End Date Employer Name with Employer
All positions held in last 5-10 years (even if more than one position is with the same employer):
Title (Dates help only if in more than one position with the same employer)
15 words or less regarding duties
Use the bullet format discussed above only if achievements were highly significant.

Start / End Date Employer Name with employer
Positions held 10 years ago or more (even if more than one position is with the same employer):
Title (Dates help only if in more than one position with the same employer)

Additional Achievements

(Optional–may include non-employer related projects that are germane to career path)

Professional Certifications / Memberships

Skill Areas – Note computer skills, programs, etc., with which you have a high level of familiarity through use or training. Mention these in the simplest terms possible (name / version number).

The objective of a resume is to generate further interest. By keeping it brief (2 pages) you are not disclosing everything. Hopefully this highlight information will earn you an interview.